Meet the Player: An Expose on What it is Like to Be a Student-Athlete

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Meet the Player: An Expose on What it is Like to Be a Student-Athlete

Sonali Blair & Maeve Downs, Journalists

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Being a student-athlete is one of the most time-consuming aspects of high school: school, then practice,  homework, with those only being some of the obligations needing to be met. From our personal experiences, it can be a lot! Although, it’s a choice and students are committed to it for a reason: to represent their school with a family of teammates, all with one goal in mind. We, as journalists, wanted to explore the world of student-athletes and see what our senior athletes have learned through sports by asking them a few questions:

 

Allen Koncsik

Senior on Varsity Football

Position: Middle Linebacker 

Record of the team: 2-4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Q: What is something you will always remember from playing football? 

A: “The unity it can bring and the bonding you can make with other people that you never thought you’d bond with.”

Q: What is one moment that made you laugh?

A: “When one of my coaches–he’s like 22 or like 21 so we consider him one of us–fell and his pants fell down”

Q: What is something your coach has said that has stuck with you?

A: “80 stories, one purpose”

Q: How has the sport affected your social life? Have you made closer friends with your teammates? 

A: “It has made me be a disciplined person overall so making me manage my time, being social, and schoolwork and practice.”

 

Micayla Fling

Senior on Varsity Volleyball

Position: Pin Hitter (Outside and Right Side)

Record of the team: 10-11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Q: What is something you will always remember from playing volleyball? 

A:  “Probably all of the fun pre-game rituals and superstitious activities that our team does.”

Q: What is one moment that made you laugh?

A: “Probably doing a series-long human spoon my sophomore year.”

Q: How has the sport affected your social life? Have you made closer friends with your teammates? 

A: “Not all of my closest friends are volleyball players but all volleyball players are like my closest friends.”

Q: What is one piece of advice for younger teammates or other student-athletes in general?

A: “Enjoy it while you can”

 

Theo Campbell

Senior on the Varsity Tennis team 

Singles player

Record: 4 matches won

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Q: What is something you will always remember from playing tennis? 

A: “[I will a]lways remember playing, just playing with the boys, having fun, having jokes but at the same time keeping that competitive spirit and having fun”

Q: Do you have a nickname on the team? 

A: “Terror, Terradorius, Teo, Tea, Te, The”

Q: What has it been like to balance grades with tennis?

A: “It has been really hard, but well worth it. I’ve missed a lot of days of school due to tennis, so it requires more work but has made me work harder and learn to balance things”

Q: What is one piece of advice for younger teammates or other student-athletes in general?

A: “Start sports early and get in the groove early”  

 

 

Nick Wilson

Senior on the Varsity Golf team

 

Q: How has the sport affected your social life? Have you made closer friends with your teammates?  

A: “I met a lot of people through golf, especially underclassmen as they come in each year.” 

Q: What is one piece of advice for younger teammates or other student-athletes in general?

A: “After practices, I get home and do homework. Sometimes you have to sacrifice free time to stay on top of your schoolwork.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Catie Clarke

Senior on Girl’s Varsity Cross Country

Q: What is something you will always remember from running? 

A: “Something I will always remember from running is just the feeling afterward with all my teammates and how happy we are.”

Q: What is one piece of advice for younger teammates or other student-athletes in general?

A: “Some advice I’d give to student-athletes, in general, is just to not give up and to just have fun with it because you only have four years to do what you love, so.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gabe Frahm   

Varsity Soccer player

Q: What is something you will always remember from playing soccer? 

A: “I will always remember the team chemistry outside of the school week. Many times on the weekends the team would get together and practice without the coach.”

Q: What is one moment that made you laugh?

A: “After practice one time, we had half a cooler left of ice water and the entire team decided to dunk their heads in it and my coach was laughing and that was the first time I ever heard him laugh.”

Q: What has it been like to balance grades with soccer?

A: “I definitely take advantage of my off periods. I go to the library during first and seventh [period].”

 

 

 

Being a student-athlete is not only a hobby but a commitment. A student-athlete is expected to have great responsibility in order to strive in both their sport and academics. These seniors have gone through as many as four years as a student-athlete and have shown dedication not only when playing, but while in class. Many will remember the laughs and memories that have come with playing but will carry the relationships they have formed to the next stage of their life. Overall, time management and responsibility are key to being a great student-athlete and having fun, well, that is the most important aspect of it all. Thank you to Allen Koncsik, Micayla Fling, Theo Campbell, Nick Wilson, Catie Clarke and Gabe Frahm for their participation in this expose.